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CALF MUSCLE PAIN The body region commonly referred to as the calf is in the back of the leg, just below the knee. To better understand potential causes of calf pain, let's first review the anatomy of your calves. The calf is made of three major muscles: the two gastrocnemius muscles (medial and lateral) and the soleus muscle. Another smaller muscle called the plantaris muscle is also present. There are also two bones in the calf region, the larger tibia, and the smaller fibula. Issues with any of these could cause calf pain. Causes of Calf Injury While muscle injuries are the most common cause of calf pain, there are others that may stem from circulation problems, knee joint problems, and other conditions. Determining the cause of your calf pain can help guide appropriate treatment. Some of the more common causes include: Calf Muscle Strain: This is the most common cause of acute onset calf pain. Usually, this injury occurs during a sports or exercise activity. Common symptoms of a calf strain include pain, swelling, and bruising. Medial Gastrocnemius Strain: The medial gastrocnemius is the part of the calf muscle most commonly injured. The medial head of the gastrocnemius is one of the three major calf muscles that is the source of pain when the calf muscle is strained. Plantaris Muscle Rupture: The plantaris muscle is a thin, small muscle that is not even present in about 10 percent to 20 percent of the population. The muscle runs along the gastrocnemius muscle but is a tiny fraction of the size. The plantaris muscle can rupture, causing a sudden, snapping pain in the back of the leg. Because the muscle is of no functional importance, treatment is non-operative. Achilles Tendonitis/Rupture: The Achilles tendon is the connection between the calf muscles and the heel. Calf pain is usually considered pain in the softer, muscular portion of the lower leg, whereas an Achilles tendon rupture typically causes pain in the back of the heel. Achilles ruptures that occur higher up on the tendon should be considered when evaluating calf pain. Baker's Cyst: A Baker's cyst is not a true cyst. Rather, it is a collection of knee-joint fluid that has pooled in the back of the knee. When excessive amounts of fluid accumulate, it can cause pain in the back of the leg. Occasionally, the Baker's cyst will rupture, causing the fluid to enter the calf region. Blood Clots: A blood clot needs to be considered as a cause of calf pain, especially when the calf pain is not the immediate result of an injury. Blood clots can form in the deep veins of the leg, causing a blockage in circulation. This may cause swelling and pain in the calf. Blood clots are more common in the days and weeks after injuries and surgical procedures. Knowing if you have a blood clot is important. Without treatment, the clot can travel to the lungs, causing difficulty breathing. Leg Cramps: Cramps in the leg muscles are a common cause of calf pain. Usually, the symptoms are intermittent (not constant pain) and relieved by stretching and heat application. When Should I See a Doctor? If you are unsure of the cause of your symptoms, or if you do not know the specific treatment recommendations for your condition, you should seek medical attention. Treatment of calf pain must be directed at the specific cause of your problem. Some signs that you should be seen by a doctor include Inability to walk comfortably on the affected side Injury that causes deformity of the lower leg Calf pain that occurs at night or while resting Calf pain that persists beyond a few days Swelling of the calf or ankle joint area Signs of an infection, including fever, redness, warmth Any other unusual symptoms Treatments for Calf Pain Treatment of calf pain depends entirely on the cause of the problem. Therefore, it is of utmost importance that you understand the cause of your symptoms before embarking on a treatment program. If you are unsure of your diagnosis, or how severe your condition is, you should seek medical advice before beginning any treatment plan. Some common treatments for calf pain are listed here. Not all of these treatments are appropriate for every condition, but they may be helpful in your situation. Rest: The first treatment in most cases is to rest the muscles and allow the acute inflammation to subside. Often this is the only step needed to relieve calf pain. If the symptoms are severe, crutches may be helpful as well. Ice and Heat Application: Ice packs and heat pads are among the most commonly used treatments for calf pain. Depending on your situation, one may be better to use than the other. You should also know how to properly use them for pain. Stretching: Stretching the muscles and tendons of the calf can help with some causes of calf pain. A good routine should be established. Learning the basics will help you on your way. PhysioTherapy: Physiotherapy is an important aspect of treatment of almost all orthopedic conditions. Physiotherapists use different techniques to increase strength, regain mobility, and help return patients to their pre-injury level of activity. Anti-Inflammatory Medication: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications, commonly referred to as NSAIDs, are some of the most commonly prescribed medications, especially for patients with calf pain caused by acute inflammation. For more info visit us at https://physiotherapyhyderabad.nowfloats.com/bizFloat/59f1747dc1b53d083007361d/CALF-MUSCLE-PAIN-The-body-region-commonly-referred-to-as-the-calf-is-in-the-back-of-the-leg-just-below-the-knee-To-better-understand-potential-causes-of-calf-pain-let-s-first-review-the-anato
CALF MUSCLE PAIN

The body region commonly referred to as the calf is in the back of the leg, just below the knee. To better understand potential causes of calf pain, let's first review the anatomy of your calves.

The calf is made of three major muscles: the two gastrocnemius muscles (medial and lateral) and the soleus muscle. Another smaller muscle called the plantaris muscle is also present. There are also two bones in the calf region, the larger tibia, and the smaller fibula.


Issues with any of these could cause calf pain.

Causes of Calf Injury
While muscle injuries are the most common cause of calf pain, there are others that may stem from circulation problems, knee joint problems, and other conditions. Determining the cause of your calf pain can help guide appropriate treatment. Some of the more common causes include:

Calf Muscle Strain: This is the most common cause of acute onset calf pain. Usually, this injury occurs during a sports or exercise activity. Common symptoms of a calf strain include pain, swelling, and bruising.
Medial Gastrocnemius Strain: The medial gastrocnemius is the part of the calf muscle most commonly injured. The medial head of the gastrocnemius is one of the three major calf muscles that is the source of pain when the calf muscle is strained.
Plantaris Muscle Rupture: The plantaris muscle is a thin, small muscle that is not even present in about 10 percent to 20 percent of the population. The muscle runs along the gastrocnemius muscle but is a tiny fraction of the size. The plantaris muscle can rupture, causing a sudden, snapping pain in the back of the leg. Because the muscle is of no functional importance, treatment is non-operative.
Achilles Tendonitis/Rupture: The Achilles tendon is the connection between the calf muscles and the heel. Calf pain is usually considered pain in the softer, muscular portion of the lower leg, whereas an Achilles tendon rupture typically causes pain in the back of the heel. Achilles ruptures that occur higher up on the tendon should be considered when evaluating calf pain.

Baker's Cyst: A Baker's cyst is not a true cyst. Rather, it is a collection of knee-joint fluid that has pooled in the back of the knee. When excessive amounts of fluid accumulate, it can cause pain in the back of the leg. Occasionally, the Baker's cyst will rupture, causing the fluid to enter the calf region.
Blood Clots: A blood clot needs to be considered as a cause of calf pain, especially when the calf pain is not the immediate result of an injury. Blood clots can form in the deep veins of the leg, causing a blockage in circulation. This may cause swelling and pain in the calf. Blood clots are more common in the days and weeks after injuries and surgical procedures. Knowing if you have a blood clot is important. Without treatment, the clot can travel to the lungs, causing difficulty breathing.
Leg Cramps: Cramps in the leg muscles are a common cause of calf pain. Usually, the symptoms are intermittent (not constant pain) and relieved by stretching and heat application.
When Should I See a Doctor?
If you are unsure of the cause of your symptoms, or if you do not know the specific treatment recommendations for your condition, you should seek medical attention. Treatment of calf pain must be directed at the specific cause of your problem.


Some signs that you should be seen by a doctor include

Inability to walk comfortably on the affected side
Injury that causes deformity of the lower leg
Calf pain that occurs at night or while resting
Calf pain that persists beyond a few days
Swelling of the calf or ankle joint area
Signs of an infection, including fever, redness, warmth
Any other unusual symptoms
Treatments for Calf Pain
Treatment of calf pain depends entirely on the cause of the problem. Therefore, it is of utmost importance that you understand the cause of your symptoms before embarking on a treatment program. If you are unsure of your diagnosis, or how severe your condition is, you should seek medical advice before beginning any treatment plan.

Some common treatments for calf pain are listed here. Not all of these treatments are appropriate for every condition, but they may be helpful in your situation.

Rest: The first treatment in most cases is to rest the muscles and allow the acute inflammation to subside. Often this is the only step needed to relieve calf pain. If the symptoms are severe, crutches may be helpful as well.
Ice and Heat Application: Ice packs and heat pads are among the most commonly used treatments for calf pain. Depending on your situation, one may be better to use than the other. You should also know how to properly use them for pain.
Stretching: Stretching the muscles and tendons of the calf can help with some causes of calf pain. A good routine should be established. Learning the basics will help you on your way.

PhysioTherapy: Physiotherapy is an important aspect of treatment of almost all orthopedic conditions. Physiotherapists use different techniques to increase strength, regain mobility, and help return patients to their pre-injury level of activity.
Anti-Inflammatory Medication: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications, commonly referred to as NSAIDs, are some of the most commonly prescribed medications, especially for patients with calf pain caused by acute inflammation.
1508996221
CALF MUSCLE PAIN The body region commonly referred to as the calf is in the back of the leg, just below the knee. To better understand potential causes of calf pain, let's first review the anatomy of your calves. The calf is made of three major muscles: the two gastrocnemius muscles (medial and lateral) and the soleus muscle. Another smaller muscle called the plantaris muscle is also present. There are also two bones in the calf region, the larger tibia, and the smaller fibula. Issues with any of these could cause calf pain. Causes of Calf Injury While muscle injuries are the most common cause of calf pain, there are others that may stem from circulation problems, knee joint problems, and other conditions. Determining the cause of your calf pain can help guide appropriate treatment. Some of the more common causes include: Calf Muscle Strain: This is the most common cause of acute onset calf pain. Usually, this injury occurs during a sports or exercise activity. Common symptoms of a calf strain include pain, swelling, and bruising. Medial Gastrocnemius Strain: The medial gastrocnemius is the part of the calf muscle most commonly injured. The medial head of the gastrocnemius is one of the three major calf muscles that is the source of pain when the calf muscle is strained. Plantaris Muscle Rupture: The plantaris muscle is a thin, small muscle that is not even present in about 10 percent to 20 percent of the population. The muscle runs along the gastrocnemius muscle but is a tiny fraction of the size. The plantaris muscle can rupture, causing a sudden, snapping pain in the back of the leg. Because the muscle is of no functional importance, treatment is non-operative. Achilles Tendonitis/Rupture: The Achilles tendon is the connection between the calf muscles and the heel. Calf pain is usually considered pain in the softer, muscular portion of the lower leg, whereas an Achilles tendon rupture typically causes pain in the back of the heel. Achilles ruptures that occur higher up on the tendon should be considered when evaluating calf pain. Baker's Cyst: A Baker's cyst is not a true cyst. Rather, it is a collection of knee-joint fluid that has pooled in the back of the knee. When excessive amounts of fluid accumulate, it can cause pain in the back of the leg. Occasionally, the Baker's cyst will rupture, causing the fluid to enter the calf region. Blood Clots: A blood clot needs to be considered as a cause of calf pain, especially when the calf pain is not the immediate result of an injury. Blood clots can form in the deep veins of the leg, causing a blockage in circulation. This may cause swelling and pain in the calf. Blood clots are more common in the days and weeks after injuries and surgical procedures. Knowing if you have a blood clot is important. Without treatment, the clot can travel to the lungs, causing difficulty breathing. Leg Cramps: Cramps in the leg muscles are a common cause of calf pain. Usually, the symptoms are intermittent (not constant pain) and relieved by stretching and heat application. When Should I See a Doctor? If you are unsure of the cause of your symptoms, or if you do not know the specific treatment recommendations for your condition, you should seek medical attention. Treatment of calf pain must be directed at the specific cause of your problem. Some signs that you should be seen by a doctor include Inability to walk comfortably on the affected side Injury that causes deformity of the lower leg Calf pain that occurs at night or while resting Calf pain that persists beyond a few days Swelling of the calf or ankle joint area Signs of an infection, including fever, redness, warmth Any other unusual symptoms Treatments for Calf Pain Treatment of calf pain depends entirely on the cause of the problem. Therefore, it is of utmost importance that you understand the cause of your symptoms before embarking on a treatment program. If you are unsure of your diagnosis, or how severe your condition is, you should seek medical advice before beginning any treatment plan. Some common treatments for calf pain are listed here. Not all of these treatments are appropriate for every condition, but they may be helpful in your situation. Rest: The first treatment in most cases is to rest the muscles and allow the acute inflammation to subside. Often this is the only step needed to relieve calf pain. If the symptoms are severe, crutches may be helpful as well. Ice and Heat Application: Ice packs and heat pads are among the most commonly used treatments for calf pain. Depending on your situation, one may be better to use than the other. You should also know how to properly use them for pain. Stretching: Stretching the muscles and tendons of the calf can help with some causes of calf pain. A good routine should be established. Learning the basics will help you on your way. PhysioTherapy: Physiotherapy is an important aspect of treatment of almost all orthopedic conditions. Physiotherapists use different techniques to increase strength, regain mobility, and help return patients to their pre-injury level of activity. Anti-Inflammatory Medication: Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications, commonly referred to as NSAIDs, are some of the most commonly prescribed medications, especially for patients with calf pain caused by acute inflammation.
1508935599
What Causes a Heel Spur? A heel spur is caused by chronic plantar fasciitis. Your plantar fascia is a thick fibrous band of connective tissue originating on the bottom surface of the calcaneus (heel bone) and extending along the sole of the foot towards the toes.Your plantar fascia acts as a passive limitation to the overflattening of your arch. When your plantar fascia develops micro tears or becomes inflammed it is known as plantar fasciitis. When plantar fasciitis healing is delayed or injury persists, your body repairs the weak and injured soft tissue with bone. Usually your injured fascia will be healed via fibroblastic activity. They'll operate for at least six weeks. If your injury persists beyond this time, osteoblasts are recruited to the area. Osteoblasts form bone and the end result is bone (or calcification) within the plantar fascia or at the calcaneal insertion. These bone formations are known as heel spurs. This scenario is most common in the traction type injury. The additional bone growth is known as a heel spur or calcaneal spur. More information: plantar fasciitis. What are the Symptoms of a Heel Spur? You'll typically first notice early heel spur pain under your heel in the morning or after resting. Your heel pain will be worse with the first steps and improves with activity as it warms up. When you palpate the tender area you may feel a tender bony lump. How Does a Heel Spur Progress? As your plantar fasciitis deteriorates and your heel spur grows, the pain will be present more often. How is a Heel Spur Diagnosed? Heel spurs and plantar fasciitis is usually diagnosed by your physiotherapist or sports doctor based on your symptoms, history and clinical examination. After confirming your heel spur or plantar fasciitis they will investigate WHY you are likely to be predisposed to heel spurs and develop a treatment plan to decrease your chance of future bouts. X-rays will show calcification or bone within the plantar fascia or at its insertion into the calcaneus. This is known as a calcaneal or heel spur. Ultrasound scans and MRI are used to identify any plantar fasciitis tears, inflammation or calcification. Pathology tests (including screening for HLA B27 antigen) may identify spondyloarthritis, which can cause symptoms similar to plantar fasciitis. Risk Factors for Heel Spurs You are more likely to develop plantar fasciitis and heel spurs if you are: Active - Sports that place excessive stress on the heel bone and attached tissue, especially if you have tight calf muscles or a stiff ankle from a previous ankle sprain, which limits ankle movement eg. running, ballet dancing and aerobics. Overweight - Carrying around extra weight increases the strain and stress on your plantar fascia. Pregnant – The weight gain and swelling associated with pregnancy can cause ligaments to become more relaxed, which can lead to mechanical problems and inflammation. On your feet – Having a job that requires a lot of walking or standing on hard surfaces ie factory workers, teachers and waitresses. Flat Feet or High Foot Arches – Changes in the arch of your foot changes the shock absorption ability and can stretch and strain the plantar fascia, which then has to absorb the additional force. Middle-Aged or Older – With ageing the arch of your foot may begin to sag – putting extra stress on the plantar fascia. Wearing shoes with poor support. Weak Foot Arch Muscles. Muscle fatigue allows your plantar fascia to overstress and cause injury. Arthritis. Some types of arthritis can cause inflammation in the tendons in the bottom of your foot, which may lead to plantar fasciitis. Diabetes. Although doctors don't know why, plantar fasciitis occurs more often in people with diabetes. Heel Spur Prognosis The good news is that heel spur pain is rarely permanent. Plantar fasciitis, the main cause of a heel spur, is reversible and very successfully treated. Over 90 percent of people with plantar fasciitis or heel spurs improve significantly with physiotherapy treatment. While you may continue to see a heel spur on Xray, once you settle the inflammation adjacent to your heel spur, the heel pain will resolve. If your plantar fasciitis or heel spur pain continues after a few months of conservative treatment, your doctor may inject your heel with steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (corticosteroid). Cortisone injections have been shown to have short-term benefits but they may retard your progress in the medium to long-term, which can mean that you will suffer recurrent bouts for longer. Further research is required to improve results. Heel Spur Treatment Due to poor foot biomechanics being the primary cause of your plantar fasciitis it is vital to thoroughly assess and correct your foot and leg biomechanics to prevent future plantar fasciitis episodes or the development of a heel spur. Your physiotherapist is an expert in foot assessment and its dynamic biomechanical correction. They may recommend that you seek the advice of a podiatrist, who is an expert in the prescription on passive foot devices such as orthotics. Active foot stabilisation exercises are an excellent long-term solution to prevent and control heel spurs and plantar fasciitis. Researchers have concluded that there are essentially 8 stages that need to be covered to effectively rehabilitate plantar fasciitis and prevent recurrence. These are: Early Injury Protection: Pain Relief & Anti-inflammatory Modalities Regain Full Range of Motion Restore Foot Arch Muscle Control Restore Normal Calf & Leg Muscle Control Restore Normal Foot Biomechanics Improve Your Running and Landing Technique Return to Sport or Work Footwear Analysis Treatment of heel spurs is similar to plantar fasciitis treatment. Your physiotherapist will select the most appropriate treatment modalities for you.< ultimately,="" biomechanical="" correction="" is="" the="" aim.="" foot="" intrinsic="" muscle="" strengthening="" (including="" tibialis="" posterior="" and="" peroneus="" longus)="" and="" calf="" (gastrocnemius="" and="" soleus)="" stretches="" are="" almost="" always="" required.="" cases="" of="" moderate="" to="" severe="" biomechanical="" deformity="" should="" be="" referred="" for="" physiotherapy="" or="" podiatric="" assessment="" to="" prevent="" chronic="" recurrence.="" nsaid's="" and="" corticosteroid="" injection="" is="" most="" effective="" when="" combined="" with="" biomechanical="" correction.="" mechanical="" treatment="" that="" involves="" taping="" and="" orthoses="" has="" been="" shown="" to="" be="" more="" effective="" than="" either="" anti-inflammatories="" or="" accommodative="" modalities.="" plantar="" fascia="" night="" splints="" essentially="" overstretch="" the="" plantar="" fascia,="" which="" may="" provide="" you="" with="" some="" short-term="" relief,="" but="" ultimately="" elongates="" your="" passive="" arch="" structures.="" the="" medium="" and="" long-term="" benefits="" make="" no="" sense="" of="" this="" rationale.="" to="" the="" contrary,="" permanent="" elongation="" will="" predispose="" you="" to="" flatter="" arches="" and="" more="" likelihood="" of="" recurrent="" heel="" pain.="" based="" on="" this="" we="" do="" not="" currently="" recommend="" plantar="" fascia="" night="" splints="" in="" most="" instances.="" what="" happens="" if="" you="" do="" nothing?="" left="" untreated,="" heel="" spurs="" grow="" larger="" and="" usually="" become="" excessively="" painful.="" for="" more="" specific="" advice="" about="" your="" heel="" spur="" or="" plantar="" fasciitis,="" please="" contact="" your="" physiotherapist.="" for="" more="" info="" visit="" us="" at="">
What Causes a Heel Spur?
A heel spur is caused by chronic plantar fasciitis.

Your plantar fascia is a thick fibrous band of connective tissue originating on the bottom surface of the calcaneus (heel bone) and extending along the sole of the foot towards the toes.Your plantar fascia acts as a passive limitation to the overflattening of your arch. When your plantar fascia develops micro tears or becomes inflammed it is known as plantar fasciitis. 

When plantar fasciitis healing is delayed or injury persists, your body repairs the weak and injured soft tissue with bone. Usually your injured fascia will be healed via fibroblastic activity. They'll operate for at least six weeks. If your injury persists beyond this time, osteoblasts are recruited to the area. Osteoblasts form bone and the end result is bone (or calcification) within the plantar fascia or at the calcaneal insertion. These bone formations are known as heel spurs.

This scenario is most common in the traction type injury. The additional bone growth is known as a heel spur or calcaneal spur.

More information: plantar fasciitis.

What are the Symptoms of a Heel Spur?
You'll typically first notice early heel spur pain under your heel in the morning or after resting.
Your heel pain will be worse with the first steps and improves with activity as it warms up. 
When you palpate the tender area you may feel a tender bony lump.
How Does a Heel Spur Progress?
As your plantar fasciitis deteriorates and your heel spur grows, the pain will be present more often. 

How is a Heel Spur Diagnosed?
Heel spurs and plantar fasciitis is usually diagnosed by your physiotherapist or sports doctor based on your symptoms, history and clinical examination.

After confirming your heel spur or plantar fasciitis they will investigate WHY you are likely to be predisposed to heel spurs and develop a treatment plan to decrease your chance of future bouts.

X-rays will show calcification or bone within the plantar fascia or at its insertion into the calcaneus. This is known as a calcaneal or heel spur.

Ultrasound scans and MRI are used to identify any plantar fasciitis tears, inflammation or calcification.

Pathology tests (including screening for HLA B27 antigen) may identify spondyloarthritis, which can cause symptoms similar to plantar fasciitis.

Risk Factors for Heel Spurs
You are more likely to develop plantar fasciitis and heel spurs if you are:

Active - Sports that place excessive stress on the heel bone and attached tissue, especially if you have tight calf muscles or a stiff ankle from a previous ankle sprain, which limits ankle movement eg. running, ballet dancing and aerobics.
Overweight - Carrying around extra weight increases the strain and stress on your plantar fascia.
Pregnant – The weight gain and swelling associated with pregnancy can cause ligaments to become more relaxed, which can lead to mechanical problems and inflammation.
On your feet – Having a job that requires a lot of walking or standing on hard surfaces ie factory workers, teachers and waitresses.
Flat Feet or High Foot Arches – Changes in the arch of your foot changes the shock absorption ability and can stretch and strain the plantar fascia, which then has to absorb the additional force.
Middle-Aged or Older – With ageing the arch of your foot may begin to sag – putting extra stress on the plantar fascia.
Wearing shoes with poor support.
Weak Foot Arch Muscles. Muscle fatigue allows your plantar fascia to overstress and cause injury.
Arthritis. Some types of arthritis can cause inflammation in the tendons in the bottom of your foot, which may lead to plantar fasciitis. 
Diabetes. Although doctors don't know why, plantar fasciitis occurs more often in people with diabetes. 
Heel Spur Prognosis
The good news is that heel spur pain is rarely permanent. Plantar fasciitis, the main cause of a heel spur, is reversible and very successfully treated. Over 90 percent of people with plantar fasciitis or heel spurs improve significantly with physiotherapy treatment. While you may continue to see a heel spur on Xray, once you settle the inflammation adjacent to your heel spur, the heel pain will resolve.

If your plantar fasciitis or heel spur pain continues after a few months of conservative treatment, your doctor may inject your heel with steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (corticosteroid). Cortisone injections have been shown to have short-term benefits but they may retard your progress in the medium to long-term, which can mean that you will suffer recurrent bouts for longer. Further research is required to improve results.

Heel Spur Treatment
Due to poor foot biomechanics being the primary cause of your plantar fasciitis it is vital to thoroughly assess and correct your foot and leg biomechanics to prevent future plantar fasciitis episodes or the development of a heel spur.

Your physiotherapist is an expert in foot assessment and its dynamic biomechanical correction. They may recommend that you seek the advice of a podiatrist, who is an expert in the prescription on passive foot devices such as orthotics.

Active foot stabilisation exercises are an excellent long-term solution to prevent and control heel spurs and plantar fasciitis.

Researchers have concluded that there are essentially 8 stages that need to be covered to effectively rehabilitate plantar fasciitis and prevent recurrence. These are:

Early Injury Protection: Pain Relief & Anti-inflammatory Modalities
Regain Full Range of Motion
Restore Foot Arch Muscle Control
Restore Normal Calf & Leg Muscle Control
Restore Normal Foot Biomechanics
Improve Your Running and Landing Technique
Return to Sport or Work
Footwear Analysis
Treatment of heel spurs is similar to plantar fasciitis treatment. Your physiotherapist will select the most appropriate treatment modalities for you.<

Ultimately, biomechanical correction is the aim. Foot intrinsic muscle strengthening (including tibialis posterior and peroneus longus) and calf (gastrocnemius and soleus) stretches are almost always required.

Cases of moderate to severe biomechanical deformity should be referred for physiotherapy or podiatric assessment to prevent chronic recurrence. NSAID's and corticosteroid injection is most effective when combined with biomechanical correction.

Mechanical treatment that involves taping and orthoses has been shown to be more effective than either anti-inflammatories or accommodative modalities.

Plantar fascia night splints essentially overstretch the plantar fascia, which may provide you with some short-term relief, but ultimately elongates your passive arch structures. The medium and long-term benefits make no sense of this rationale. To the contrary, permanent elongation will predispose you to flatter arches and more likelihood of recurrent heel pain. Based on this we do NOT currently recommend plantar fascia night splints in most instances.

What Happens If You Do Nothing?
Left untreated, heel spurs grow larger and usually become excessively painful. For more specific advice about your heel spur or plantar fasciitis, please contact your physiotherapist.
1508933061
What Causes a Heel Spur? A heel spur is caused by chronic plantar fasciitis. Your plantar fascia is a thick fibrous band of connective tissue originating on the bottom surface of the calcaneus (heel bone) and extending along the sole of the foot towards the toes.Your plantar fascia acts as a passive limitation to the overflattening of your arch. When your plantar fascia develops micro tears or becomes inflammed it is known as plantar fasciitis. When plantar fasciitis healing is delayed or injury persists, your body repairs the weak and injured soft tissue with bone. Usually your injured fascia will be healed via fibroblastic activity. They'll operate for at least six weeks. If your injury persists beyond this time, osteoblasts are recruited to the area. Osteoblasts form bone and the end result is bone (or calcification) within the plantar fascia or at the calcaneal insertion. These bone formations are known as heel spurs. This scenario is most common in the traction type injury. The additional bone growth is known as a heel spur or calcaneal spur. More information: plantar fasciitis. What are the Symptoms of a Heel Spur? You'll typically first notice early heel spur pain under your heel in the morning or after resting. Your heel pain will be worse with the first steps and improves with activity as it warms up. When you palpate the tender area you may feel a tender bony lump. How Does a Heel Spur Progress? As your plantar fasciitis deteriorates and your heel spur grows, the pain will be present more often. How is a Heel Spur Diagnosed? Heel spurs and plantar fasciitis is usually diagnosed by your physiotherapist or sports doctor based on your symptoms, history and clinical examination. After confirming your heel spur or plantar fasciitis they will investigate WHY you are likely to be predisposed to heel spurs and develop a treatment plan to decrease your chance of future bouts. X-rays will show calcification or bone within the plantar fascia or at its insertion into the calcaneus. This is known as a calcaneal or heel spur. Ultrasound scans and MRI are used to identify any plantar fasciitis tears, inflammation or calcification. Pathology tests (including screening for HLA B27 antigen) may identify spondyloarthritis, which can cause symptoms similar to plantar fasciitis. Risk Factors for Heel Spurs You are more likely to develop plantar fasciitis and heel spurs if you are: Active - Sports that place excessive stress on the heel bone and attached tissue, especially if you have tight calf muscles or a stiff ankle from a previous ankle sprain, which limits ankle movement eg. running, ballet dancing and aerobics. Overweight - Carrying around extra weight increases the strain and stress on your plantar fascia. Pregnant – The weight gain and swelling associated with pregnancy can cause ligaments to become more relaxed, which can lead to mechanical problems and inflammation. On your feet – Having a job that requires a lot of walking or standing on hard surfaces ie factory workers, teachers and waitresses. Flat Feet or High Foot Arches – Changes in the arch of your foot changes the shock absorption ability and can stretch and strain the plantar fascia, which then has to absorb the additional force. Middle-Aged or Older – With ageing the arch of your foot may begin to sag – putting extra stress on the plantar fascia. Wearing shoes with poor support. Weak Foot Arch Muscles. Muscle fatigue allows your plantar fascia to overstress and cause injury. Arthritis. Some types of arthritis can cause inflammation in the tendons in the bottom of your foot, which may lead to plantar fasciitis. Diabetes. Although doctors don't know why, plantar fasciitis occurs more often in people with diabetes. Heel Spur Prognosis The good news is that heel spur pain is rarely permanent. Plantar fasciitis, the main cause of a heel spur, is reversible and very successfully treated. Over 90 percent of people with plantar fasciitis or heel spurs improve significantly with physiotherapy treatment. While you may continue to see a heel spur on Xray, once you settle the inflammation adjacent to your heel spur, the heel pain will resolve. If your plantar fasciitis or heel spur pain continues after a few months of conservative treatment, your doctor may inject your heel with steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (corticosteroid). Cortisone injections have been shown to have short-term benefits but they may retard your progress in the medium to long-term, which can mean that you will suffer recurrent bouts for longer. Further research is required to improve results. Heel Spur Treatment Due to poor foot biomechanics being the primary cause of your plantar fasciitis it is vital to thoroughly assess and correct your foot and leg biomechanics to prevent future plantar fasciitis episodes or the development of a heel spur. Your physiotherapist is an expert in foot assessment and its dynamic biomechanical correction. They may recommend that you seek the advice of a podiatrist, who is an expert in the prescription on passive foot devices such as orthotics. Active foot stabilisation exercises are an excellent long-term solution to prevent and control heel spurs and plantar fasciitis. Researchers have concluded that there are essentially 8 stages that need to be covered to effectively rehabilitate plantar fasciitis and prevent recurrence. These are: Early Injury Protection: Pain Relief & Anti-inflammatory Modalities Regain Full Range of Motion Restore Foot Arch Muscle Control Restore Normal Calf & Leg Muscle Control Restore Normal Foot Biomechanics Improve Your Running and Landing Technique Return to Sport or Work Footwear Analysis Treatment of heel spurs is similar to plantar fasciitis treatment. Your physiotherapist will select the most appropriate treatment modalities for you.< ultimately,="" biomechanical="" correction="" is="" the="" aim.="" foot="" intrinsic="" muscle="" strengthening="" (including="" tibialis="" posterior="" and="" peroneus="" longus)="" and="" calf="" (gastrocnemius="" and="" soleus)="" stretches="" are="" almost="" always="" required.="" cases="" of="" moderate="" to="" severe="" biomechanical="" deformity="" should="" be="" referred="" for="" physiotherapy="" or="" podiatric="" assessment="" to="" prevent="" chronic="" recurrence.="" nsaid's="" and="" corticosteroid="" injection="" is="" most="" effective="" when="" combined="" with="" biomechanical="" correction.="" mechanical="" treatment="" that="" involves="" taping="" and="" orthoses="" has="" been="" shown="" to="" be="" more="" effective="" than="" either="" anti-inflammatories="" or="" accommodative="" modalities.="" plantar="" fascia="" night="" splints="" essentially="" overstretch="" the="" plantar="" fascia,="" which="" may="" provide="" you="" with="" some="" short-term="" relief,="" but="" ultimately="" elongates="" your="" passive="" arch="" structures.="" the="" medium="" and="" long-term="" benefits="" make="" no="" sense="" of="" this="" rationale.="" to="" the="" contrary,="" permanent="" elongation="" will="" predispose="" you="" to="" flatter="" arches="" and="" more="" likelihood="" of="" recurrent="" heel="" pain.="" based="" on="" this="" we="" do="" not="" currently="" recommend="" plantar="" fascia="" night="" splints="" in="" most="" instances.="" what="" happens="" if="" you="" do="" nothing?="" left="" untreated,="" heel="" spurs="" grow="" larger="" and="" usually="" become="" excessively="" painful.="" for="" more="" specific="" advice="" about="" your="" heel="" spur="" or="" plantar="" fasciitis,="" please="" contact="" your="">
1509785687
An ankle sprain is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for 14% of all sport related injuries. Among these, 80% are ligamentous sprains. Inversion injuries are four times more common than eversion injuries, due to the instability of the lateral joint and weakness of the lateral ligaments in comparison with the medial. (Lateral - outer surface of ankle, Medial- inner surface) The usual mechanism of lateral ligament injury is inversion and plantar flexion, which damages the anterior talofibular ligament before the calcaneofibular ligament. The anterior talofibular ligament can tolerate ~50% the strain of the calcaneofibular ligament before tearing, and it is also taut in plantarflexion, meanwhile, the calcaneofibular ligament is relatively loose. Complete tear of the anterior talofibular ligament, calcaneofibular ligament, and posterior talofibular ligament, results in a dislocation of the ankle joint and is frequently associated with a fracture. In our ALLOCARE PHYSIOTHERAPY CLINIC first line of pain management starts with RICE treatment (Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation). sever case you can use Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can be administered for reduction of pain and swelling.in our ALLOCARE PHYSIOTHERAPY CLINIC after RICE management we go through soft tissue therapy and mobilization. The next phase is rehab , in ALLOCARE PHYSIOTHERAPY CLINIC we have well experienced sports rehab physiotherapist they have immense knowledge regarding sports related injuries , the rehab part includes restoration of full of motion, followed by muscle conditioning, preconception and lastly functional exercise to ensure return to sport without pain. For more info visit us at https://physiotherapyhyderabad.nowfloats.com/bizFloat/59fd6c455447620540be1c27/An-ankle-sprain-is-the-most-common-acute-sport-trauma-accounting-for-14-of-all-sport-related-injuries-Among-these-80-are-ligamentous-sprains-Inversion-injuries-are-four-times-more-common-than

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17.4495163478745 78.3643098323107 Allocare Physiotherapy Miyapur Gachibowli Rd, Anjaiah Nagar, Gachibowli, Telangana 500032.
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