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SEDENTARY BEHAVIOR EFFECTS One of the worst things you can do to your body is doing nothing at all: Sitting parked on your butt can be just as dangerous as being obese, according to a study from the University of Cambridge. Globally, 1 in 4 adults aren’t moving enough, according to the World Health Organization. And even if you think you’re an active person, you might be spending just enough time in front of your TV when you’re not at the gym to be putting your health at risk. What’s more, the effects of staying seated go far beyond what you may think. Sure, your sedentary behavior can hurt your heart and make you fat, but it might also be responsible for some more surprising, effects too. These 7 sinister side effects of living a sedentary life will have you itching to jump out of your seat. Read on to learn more—and to discover the easiest thing you can do right now to reverse the damage. 1: YOUR MOOD TAKES A DIVE Feeling down? Blame your chair: After surveying more than 3, 300 government employees, Australian researchers found that men who sat for more than 6 hours a day at work were 90 percent more likely to feel moderate psychological distress—like feeling nervous, restless, hopeless, or even tired—than men who sat for less than 3 hours a day. What’s more, other types of sedentary behavior—like watching TV or playing electronic games—can increase your risk for anxiety, according to a recent meta-analysis of nine studies published in BMC Public Health. That might be because if you’re spending your time on those pastimes, you’re probably not fitting in enough physical activity, the researchers say. (Here are 7 things that destroy your mood.) And that’s important, since exercise has mood-boosting benefits. When you work up a sweat, your body produces feel-good hormones called endorphins, according to the Mayo Clinic. What’s more, recent research indicates that cardio can boost your mood just as effectively as prescribed antidepressants. 2: YOUR CANCER RISK SKYROCKETS A German meta-analysis of 43 different studies including more than 4 million people found that sedentary behavior significantly increases your risk for several types of cancer. People who logged the most sitting time experienced a 24 percent higher risk of developing colon cancer, a 32 percent higher risk of endometrial cancer, and a 21 percent higher risk of lung cancer. Plus, the risks about doubled for people who usually spent their butt time parked in front of the TV, possibly because you tend to nosh on sweetened beverages and junk foods when you’re glued to the screen, the researchers say. And that paves the way for obesity. Large studies have consistently shown that higher levels of body fat can spike your cancer risk. That’s because chronic local inflammation can attack your body’s cells, leading to cancer-causing DNA damage over time, according to the National Cancer Institute. Plus, a surplus of fat cells eventually produce hormones that lead to cell proliferation, a process that causes your cells to grow and divide rapidly. (Here are 10 things you can do to prevent cancer.) 3: YOU START TO FORGET THINGS Your brain health suffers when you lounge for too long: Older adults who are sedentary may be just as likely to develop dementia as people who are genetically predisposed to the condition, new research published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease found. In a study of more than 1, 600 adults 65 and older, the researchers found that people with a gene strongly associated with dementia were nearly twice as likely to develop it as people without the gene. But when they looked at people who didn’t exercise regularly, they found that their odds of developing dementia were similar. 4: YOUR BLOOD SUGAR SPIKES Even if you’re at a healthy weight, your blood sugar levels can rise if you’re parked in a chair for too long, according to a recent University of Florida study. In fact, sedentary adults were more likely to have blood sugar levels at 5.7 percent or above in an A1C test, which is high enough to be considered prediabetes by the American Diabetes Association, the researchers note. While these people maintained a healthy weight, they had a higher ration of fat to muscle, with an average of 25 percent body fat or more for men. This “skinny fat” condition leads to various metabolic issues, like higher blood pressure, blood sugar, and cholesterol levels, the researchers say. If you’re in the prediabetes range, losing 5 to 7 percent of your body weight (about 10 to 14 pounds for a 200-pound guy) and making time for 150 minutes of exercise a week can delay the onset of full-fledged diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 5: YOUR SEX LIFE SLOWS DOWN our inactive behavior can lead to a gut, and that might be setting yourself up for penis problems down the road. Men with a bigger belly—or a waist of 42 inches or more—are more than twice as likely to have erectile dysfunction (ED) than those with waists below 32 inches, one Harvard study found. (Here are 10 simple ways to protect your erection right now.) Your swimmers can take a hit, too. Men who binged on TV for more than 5 hours a day had 29 percent lower sperm concentration than men who didn’t watch any TV, recent Danish research found. Take note: The work you put in at the gym follows you to the bedroom. After surveying 300 men, researchers from the Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles found that highly active men—or men that completed 3.5 hours of moderate exercise or more a week—had higher sexual function scores than men who reported lower levels of physical activity. 6: YOU’LL TOSS AND TURN Ever feel like you sleep more soundly after logging a great workout? That’s because exercising at least 150 minutes a week can improve the quality of your shuteye, according to a study published in Mental Health and Physical Activity. When people met those physical activity guidelines, their risk for daytime sleepiness dropped compared to people who didn't hit the guidelines, the researchers found. Those who exercise vigorously are nearly twice as likely to experience a good night’s sleep every night compared to people who avoid the gym, a National Sleep Foundation poll found. In fact, more than two thirds of vigorous exercisers reported almost never experiencing symptoms associated with insomnia. On the flip side, 50 percent of people who don’t exercise reported waking up in the middle of the night. Just keep in mind that when you get moving can impact your sleep, too: Here is the best time to work out for a better night’s sleep. 7: YOUR BACKACHE GETS WORSE The effects of slouching in front of your computer can last beyond your workday. Sitting for as little as 4 hours straight can increase pressure on the disks in your lower back, a Penn State study found. This compression can lead to disk degeneration, a common culprit behind back pain. So get up and move, the researchers suggest. When the participants in the study changed their position every 15 minutes, they didn’t see any adverse effects in their disks. While you might assume rest is the answer, research shows that movement is great pain medicine. Just 25 minutes of aerobic exercise—like running or swimming—can reduce your back pain perception by 28 percent, according to a study in the Journal of Rehabilitation Research & Development.
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FIBROMYALGIA Fibromyalgia is a disorder characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain accompanied by fatigue, sleep, memory and mood issues. Researchers believe that fibromyalgia amplifies painful sensations by affecting the way your brain processes pain signals. Symptoms sometimes begin after a physical trauma, surgery, infection or significant psychological stress. In other cases, symptoms gradually accumulate over time with no single triggering event. Women are more likely to develop fibromyalgia than are men. Many people who have fibromyalgia also have tension headaches, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders, irritable bowel syndrome, anxiety and depression. While there is no cure for fibromyalgia, a variety of medications can help control symptoms. Exercise, relaxation and stress-reduction measures also may help. Would a TENS unit help improve fibromyalgia pain? Possibly. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a therapy sometimes used to treat localized or regional pain. During TENS therapy, electrodes deliver electrical impulses to nearby nerve pathways — which can help control or relieve some types of pain. TENS is often used to treat osteoarthritis, chronic pain and postoperative pain. Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition characterized by widespread pain in the muscles, ligaments and tendons, as well as fatigue and multiple tender points — places on the body where slight pressure causes pain. The pain of fibromyalgia isn't limited to a specific area, so TENS therapy isn't generally used as a treatment. But some research has shown that TENS may be effective for reducing pain in people who have fibromyalgia, especially in combination with other treatments, such as exercise. Fibromyalgia is often treated with various medications to relieve pain and improve sleep. Options may include medicines used to treat other disorders, such as antidepressants and anti-seizure medicines, as well as mild pain relievers. Exercise is the main treatment, along with stress reduction and healthy sleep habits. Your doctor may also recommend cognitive behavioral therapy — working with a mental health professional to learn effective ways of thinking about and dealing with your condition. If you have fibromyalgia and your treatment plan isn't relieving your pain, talk with your doctor. He or she may adjust your medications or offer other treatment options. For more info visit us at https://physiotherapyhyderabad.nowfloats.com/bizFloat/5983006d122736054050276a/FIBROMYALGIA-Fibromyalgia-is-a-disorder-characterized-by-widespread-musculoskeletal-pain-accompanied-by-fatigue-sleep-memory-and-mood-issues-Researchers-believe-that-fibromyalgia-amplifies-pa
FIBROMYALGIA
Fibromyalgia is a disorder characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain accompanied by fatigue, sleep, memory and mood issues. Researchers believe that fibromyalgia amplifies painful sensations by affecting the way your brain processes pain signals.

Symptoms sometimes begin after a physical trauma, surgery, infection or significant psychological stress. In other cases, symptoms gradually accumulate over time with no single triggering event.

Women are more likely to develop fibromyalgia than are men. Many people who have fibromyalgia also have tension headaches, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders, irritable bowel syndrome, anxiety and depression.

While there is no cure for fibromyalgia, a variety of medications can help control symptoms. Exercise, relaxation and stress-reduction measures also may help.

Would a TENS unit help improve fibromyalgia pain?

Possibly. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a therapy sometimes used to treat localized or regional pain. During TENS therapy, electrodes deliver electrical impulses to nearby nerve pathways — which can help control or relieve some types of pain. TENS is often used to treat osteoarthritis, chronic pain and postoperative pain.

Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition characterized by widespread pain in the muscles, ligaments and tendons, as well as fatigue and multiple tender points — places on the body where slight pressure causes pain. The pain of fibromyalgia isn't limited to a specific area, so TENS therapy isn't generally used as a treatment. But some research has shown that TENS may be effective for reducing pain in people who have fibromyalgia, especially in combination with other treatments, such as exercise.

Fibromyalgia is often treated with various medications to relieve pain and improve sleep. Options may include medicines used to treat other disorders, such as antidepressants and anti-seizure medicines, as well as mild pain relievers.

Exercise is the main treatment, along with stress reduction and healthy sleep habits. Your doctor may also recommend cognitive behavioral therapy — working with a mental health professional to learn effective ways of thinking about and dealing with your condition.

If you have fibromyalgia and your treatment plan isn't relieving your pain, talk with your doctor. He or she may adjust your medications or offer other treatment options.
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FIBROMYALGIA Fibromyalgia is a disorder characterized by widespread musculoskeletal pain accompanied by fatigue, sleep, memory and mood issues. Researchers believe that fibromyalgia amplifies painful sensations by affecting the way your brain processes pain signals. Symptoms sometimes begin after a physical trauma, surgery, infection or significant psychological stress. In other cases, symptoms gradually accumulate over time with no single triggering event. Women are more likely to develop fibromyalgia than are men. Many people who have fibromyalgia also have tension headaches, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders, irritable bowel syndrome, anxiety and depression. While there is no cure for fibromyalgia, a variety of medications can help control symptoms. Exercise, relaxation and stress-reduction measures also may help. Would a TENS unit help improve fibromyalgia pain? Possibly. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a therapy sometimes used to treat localized or regional pain. During TENS therapy, electrodes deliver electrical impulses to nearby nerve pathways — which can help control or relieve some types of pain. TENS is often used to treat osteoarthritis, chronic pain and postoperative pain. Fibromyalgia is a chronic condition characterized by widespread pain in the muscles, ligaments and tendons, as well as fatigue and multiple tender points — places on the body where slight pressure causes pain. The pain of fibromyalgia isn't limited to a specific area, so TENS therapy isn't generally used as a treatment. But some research has shown that TENS may be effective for reducing pain in people who have fibromyalgia, especially in combination with other treatments, such as exercise. Fibromyalgia is often treated with various medications to relieve pain and improve sleep. Options may include medicines used to treat other disorders, such as antidepressants and anti-seizure medicines, as well as mild pain relievers. Exercise is the main treatment, along with stress reduction and healthy sleep habits. Your doctor may also recommend cognitive behavioral therapy — working with a mental health professional to learn effective ways of thinking about and dealing with your condition. If you have fibromyalgia and your treatment plan isn't relieving your pain, talk with your doctor. He or she may adjust your medications or offer other treatment options.
Carpal Tunnel Syndrome:

Carpal tunnel syndrome is a common condition that causes pain, numbness, and tingling in the hand and arm. The condition occurs when one of the major nerves to the hand — the median nerve — is squeezed or compressed as it travels through the wrist.

In most patients, carpal tunnel syndrome gets worse over time, so early diagnosis and treatment are important. Early on, symptoms can often be relieved with simple measures like wearing a wrist splint or avoiding certain activities.

If pressure on the median nerve continues, however, it can lead to nerve damage and worsening symptoms. To prevent permanent damage, surgery to take pressure off the median nerve may be recommended for some patients.

Cause:

Most cases of carpal tunnel syndrome are caused by a combination of factors. Studies show that women and older people are more likely to develop the condition.

Other risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome include:

Heredity. This is likely an important factor. The carpal tunnel may be smaller in some people or there may be anatomic differences that change the amount of space for the nerve—and these traits can run in families.
Repetitive hand use. Repeating the same hand and wrist motions or activities over a prolonged period of time may aggravate the tendons in the wrist, causing swelling that puts pressure on the nerve.
Hand and wrist position. Doing activities that involve extreme flexion or extension of the hand and wrist for a prolonged period of time can increase pressure on the nerve.
Pregnancy. Hormonal changes during pregnancy can cause swelling.
Health conditions. Diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and thyroid gland imbalance are conditions that are associated with carpal tunnel syndrome.

Symptoms:

Symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome may include:

Numbness, tingling, burning, and pain—primarily in the thumb and index, middle, and ring fingers
Occasional shock-like sensations that radiate to the thumb and index, middle, and ring fingers
Pain or tingling that may travel up the forearm toward the shoulder
Weakness and clumsiness in the hand—this may make it difficult to perform fine movements such as buttoning your clothes
Dropping things—due to weakness, numbness, or a loss of proprioception (awareness of where your hand is in space)
In most cases, the symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome begin gradually—without a specific injury. Many patients find that their symptoms come and go at first. However, as the condition worsens, symptoms may occur more frequently or may persist for longer periods of time.

Night-time symptoms are very common. Because many people sleep with their wrists bent, symptoms may awaken you from sleep. During the day, symptoms often occur when holding something for a prolonged period of time with the wrist bent forward or backward, such as when using a phone, driving, or reading a book.

Nonsurgical treatments may include:

Bracing or splinting. Wearing a brace or splint at night will keep you from bending your wrist while you sleep. Keeping your wrist in a straight or neutral position reduces pressure on the nerve in the carpal tunnel. It may also help to wear a splint during the day when doing activities that aggravate your symptoms.


Wearing a splint or brace reduces pressure on the median nerve by keeping your wrist straight.
Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Medications such as ibuprofen and naproxen can help relieve pain and inflammation.

Activity changes. Symptoms often occur when your hand and wrist are in the same position for too long—particularly when your wrist is flexed or extended.

If your job or recreational activities aggravate your symptoms, changing or modifying these activities can help slow or stop progression of the disease. In some cases, this may involve making changes to your work site or work station.

Nerve gliding exercises. Some patients may benefit from exercises that help the median nerve move more freely within the confines of the carpal tunnel. Specific exercises may be recommended by your doctor or therapist.

Steroid injections. Corticosteroid, or cortisone, is a powerful anti-inflammatory agent that can be injected into the carpal tunnel. Although these injections often relieve painful symptoms or help to calm a flare up of symptoms, their effect is sometimes only temporary. A cortisone injection may also be used by your doctor to help diagnose your carpal tunnel syndrome.
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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Carpal tunnel syndrome is a common condition that causes pain, numbness, and tingling in the hand and arm. The condition occurs when one of the major nerves to the hand — the median nerve — is squeezed or compressed as it travels through the wrist. In most patients, carpal tunnel syndrome gets worse over time, so early diagnosis and treatment are important. Early on, symptoms can often be relieved with simple measures like wearing a wrist splint or avoiding certain activities. If pressure on the median nerve continues, however, it can lead to nerve damage and worsening symptoms. To prevent permanent damage, surgery to take pressure off the median nerve may be recommended for some patients. Cause: Most cases of carpal tunnel syndrome are caused by a combination of factors. Studies show that women and older people are more likely to develop the condition. Other risk factors for carpal tunnel syndrome include: Heredity. This is likely an important factor. The carpal tunnel may be smaller in some people or there may be anatomic differences that change the amount of space for the nerve—and these traits can run in families. Repetitive hand use. Repeating the same hand and wrist motions or activities over a prolonged period of time may aggravate the tendons in the wrist, causing swelling that puts pressure on the nerve. Hand and wrist position. Doing activities that involve extreme flexion or extension of the hand and wrist for a prolonged period of time can increase pressure on the nerve. Pregnancy. Hormonal changes during pregnancy can cause swelling. Health conditions. Diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and thyroid gland imbalance are conditions that are associated with carpal tunnel syndrome. Symptoms: Symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome may include: Numbness, tingling, burning, and pain—primarily in the thumb and index, middle, and ring fingers Occasional shock-like sensations that radiate to the thumb and index, middle, and ring fingers Pain or tingling that may travel up the forearm toward the shoulder Weakness and clumsiness in the hand—this may make it difficult to perform fine movements such as buttoning your clothes Dropping things—due to weakness, numbness, or a loss of proprioception (awareness of where your hand is in space) In most cases, the symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome begin gradually—without a specific injury. Many patients find that their symptoms come and go at first. However, as the condition worsens, symptoms may occur more frequently or may persist for longer periods of time. Night-time symptoms are very common. Because many people sleep with their wrists bent, symptoms may awaken you from sleep. During the day, symptoms often occur when holding something for a prolonged period of time with the wrist bent forward or backward, such as when using a phone, driving, or reading a book. Nonsurgical treatments may include: Bracing or splinting. Wearing a brace or splint at night will keep you from bending your wrist while you sleep. Keeping your wrist in a straight or neutral position reduces pressure on the nerve in the carpal tunnel. It may also help to wear a splint during the day when doing activities that aggravate your symptoms. Wearing a splint or brace reduces pressure on the median nerve by keeping your wrist straight. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Medications such as ibuprofen and naproxen can help relieve pain and inflammation. Activity changes. Symptoms often occur when your hand and wrist are in the same position for too long—particularly when your wrist is flexed or extended. If your job or recreational activities aggravate your symptoms, changing or modifying these activities can help slow or stop progression of the disease. In some cases, this may involve making changes to your work site or work station. Nerve gliding exercises. Some patients may benefit from exercises that help the median nerve move more freely within the confines of the carpal tunnel. Specific exercises may be recommended by your doctor or therapist. Steroid injections. Corticosteroid, or cortisone, is a powerful anti-inflammatory agent that can be injected into the carpal tunnel. Although these injections often relieve painful symptoms or help to calm a flare up of symptoms, their effect is sometimes only temporary. A cortisone injection may also be used by your doctor to help diagnose your carpal tunnel syndrome.
What is Frozen Shoulder?
frozen shoulder

Frozen shoulder or adhesive capsulitis is a common source of shoulder pain. 

While frozen shoulder is commonly missed or confused with a rotator cuff injury, it has a distinct pattern of symptoms resulting in severe shoulder pain, loss of shoulder function and eventually stiffness.

The more precise medical term for a frozen shoulder is Flexion > Internal Rotation. Normally, your rotator cuff strength will still be normal with the exception of pain inhibition. Frozen shoulders are commonly non-tender on palpation examination due to the pathology being quite deep. Quick movements are very painful with patients very keen to avoid any fast movements such as reaching or throwing and catching. Who is Likely to Suffer from Frozen Shoulder? Frozen shoulder is more likely to occur in people who are 35-50 years old. It can be primary, with no known cause, or secondary, associated with an underlying illness or injury. There are a number of risk factors predisposing you to developing frozen shoulder. These include: shoulder trauma, surgery, diabetes, inflammatory conditions, inactivity of the shoulder, autoimmune disease, cervical cancer, and hyperthyroidism. Approximately 20% of people who have had a frozen shoulder will also develop frozen shoulder in their other shoulder in the future. Frozen Shoulder Treatment Physiotherapy treatment for frozen shoulder depends on what stage you are in, and is tailored to your specific needs. 1. Freezing Pain relieving techniques including gentle shoulder mobilisation, muscle releases, acupuncture, dry needling and kinesiology taping for pain-relief can assist during this painful inflammation phase. Intracapsular corticosteroid injection is considered when pain is unbearable. It is important not to aggravate a frozen shoulder during this phase, which is unfortunately a side effect of an overzealous practitioner. 2. Frozen Shoulder joint mobilisation and stretches, muscle release techniques, acupuncture, dry needling and exercises to regain range and strength are useful for a prompt return to function. Care must be taken not to introduce any exercises that are too aggressive. Overenthusiastic treatment can aggravate your capsular synovitis and subsequently pain. A quality shoulder physiotherapist will know how much is enough and how much is too much. 3. Thawing Shoulder mobilisation and stretches are your best chance of a prompt return to full shoulder movement. As your range of motion increases your physiotherapist will be able to provide you with strengthening exercises to control and maintain your newly found range of movement. Can You Prevent Frozen Shoulder? While the spontaneous onset frozen shoulder is of unknown origin, you can prevent frozen shoulder caused by disuse by avoiding long period of shoulder inactivity. eg post-surgery or shoulder injury. If you do have a shoulder or arm injury, it is always advisable to seek the professional advice of someone such as your shoulder physiotherapist about exercises to help prevent a secondary frozen shoulder developing. This is especially important if you are in a high risk category. For more information, please contact your physiotherapist. Allocare Physiotherapy For more info visit us at https://physiotherapyhyderabad.nowfloats.com/bizFloat/5a0a989a264a9605b0471eff/What-is-Frozen-Shoulder-frozen-shoulder-Frozen-shoulder-or-adhesive-capsulitis-is-a-common-source-of-shoulder-pain-While-frozen-shoulder-is-commonly-missed-or-confused-with-a-rotator-cuff-inj">
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What is Frozen Shoulder? frozen shoulder Frozen shoulder or adhesive capsulitis is a common source of shoulder pain. While frozen shoulder is commonly missed or confused with a rotator cuff injury, it has a distinct pattern of symptoms resulting in severe shoulder pain, loss of shoulder function and eventually stiffness. The more precise medical term for a frozen shoulder is "adhesive capsulitis". In basic terms, it means that your shoulder pain and stiffness is a result of shoulder capsule inflammation (capsulitis) and fibrotic adhesions that limit your shoulder movement. What Causes Frozen Shoulder? Unfortunately, there is still much unknown about frozen shoulder. One of those unknowns is why frozen shoulder starts. There are many theories but the medical community still debates what actually causes frozen shoulder. What is Known about Frozen Shoulder? Frozen shoulder causes your shoulder joint capsule to shrink, which leads to pain and reduced range of shoulder movement. Your shoulder capsule is the deepest layer of soft tissue around your shoulder joint, and plays a major role in keeping your humerus within the shoulder socket. frozen shoulder What are Frozen Shoulder Symptoms? Frozen shoulder has three stages, each of which has different symptoms. The 3 Stages are: Freezing – characterised by pain around the shoulder initially, followed by a progressive loss of range of movement. Known as the RED phase due to the capsule colour if you undergo arthroscopic surgery. Frozen – minimal pain, with no further loss or regain of range. Known as the PINK phase due to the capsule colour if you undergo arthroscopic surgery. Thawing – gradual return of range of movement, some weakness due to disuse of the shoulder. Known as the WHITE phase due to the capsule colour if you undergo arthroscopic surgery. Each stage can last on average 6 to 8 months if left untreated. How is Frozen Shoulder Diagnosed? Frozen shoulder can be diagnosed in the clinic from your clinical signs and symptoms. A clinical diagnosis of frozen shoulder can be determined by a thorough shoulder examination. Your physiotherapist will ask about what physical activities you are having difficulty performing. Common issues include: Unable to reach above shoulder height Unable to throw a ball Unable to quickly reach for something Unable to reach behind your back eg bra or tuck shirt Unable to reach out to your side and behind. eg reach for seat belt Unable to sleep on your side. In some cases you may be referred for X-rays or MRI to rule out other causes of shoulder pain. X-rays are not able to diagnose frozen shoulder. MRI or preferably MRA can provide a definitive diagnosis. A double-contrast shoulder arthrography is the traditional diagnostic method, although this is usually not required if you have a skilled shoulder practitioner assessing you. Frozen shoulder is commonly misdiagnosed or confused with rotator cuff injury by inexperienced shoulder practitioners. It is important to get an accurate diagnosis since the treatment and recovery vary considerably. Frozen Shoulder Physical Examination Your physiotherapist will ask you to perform shoulder movements. Frozen shoulder has a distinct capsular pattern of stiffness: Lateral Rotation > Flexion > Internal Rotation. Normally, your rotator cuff strength will still be normal with the exception of pain inhibition. Frozen shoulders are commonly non-tender on palpation examination due to the pathology being quite deep. Quick movements are very painful with patients very keen to avoid any fast movements such as reaching or throwing and catching. Who is Likely to Suffer from Frozen Shoulder? Frozen shoulder is more likely to occur in people who are 35-50 years old. It can be primary, with no known cause, or secondary, associated with an underlying illness or injury. There are a number of risk factors predisposing you to developing frozen shoulder. These include: shoulder trauma, surgery, diabetes, inflammatory conditions, inactivity of the shoulder, autoimmune disease, cervical cancer, and hyperthyroidism. Approximately 20% of people who have had a frozen shoulder will also develop frozen shoulder in their other shoulder in the future. Frozen Shoulder Treatment Physiotherapy treatment for frozen shoulder depends on what stage you are in, and is tailored to your specific needs. 1. Freezing Pain relieving techniques including gentle shoulder mobilisation, muscle releases, acupuncture, dry needling and kinesiology taping for pain-relief can assist during this painful inflammation phase. Intracapsular corticosteroid injection is considered when pain is unbearable. It is important not to aggravate a frozen shoulder during this phase, which is unfortunately a side effect of an overzealous practitioner. 2. Frozen Shoulder joint mobilisation and stretches, muscle release techniques, acupuncture, dry needling and exercises to regain range and strength are useful for a prompt return to function. Care must be taken not to introduce any exercises that are too aggressive. Overenthusiastic treatment can aggravate your capsular synovitis and subsequently pain. A quality shoulder physiotherapist will know how much is enough and how much is too much. 3. Thawing Shoulder mobilisation and stretches are your best chance of a prompt return to full shoulder movement. As your range of motion increases your physiotherapist will be able to provide you with strengthening exercises to control and maintain your newly found range of movement. Can You Prevent Frozen Shoulder? While the spontaneous onset frozen shoulder is of unknown origin, you can prevent frozen shoulder caused by disuse by avoiding long period of shoulder inactivity. eg post-surgery or shoulder injury. If you do have a shoulder or arm injury, it is always advisable to seek the professional advice of someone such as your shoulder physiotherapist about exercises to help prevent a secondary frozen shoulder developing. This is especially important if you are in a high risk category. For more information, please contact your physiotherapist. Allocare Physiotherapy For more info visit us at https://physiotherapyhyderabad.nowfloats.com/bizFloat/5a0a989a264a9605b0471eff/What-is-Frozen-Shoulder-frozen-shoulder-Frozen-shoulder-or-adhesive-capsulitis-is-a-common-source-of-shoulder-pain-While-frozen-shoulder-is-commonly-missed-or-confused-with-a-rotator-cuff-inj

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